Infectious Disease Compendium

Fasciola

Microbiology

A fluke. F. hepatica and F. gigantica. Stool studies have poor yield, serology is good.

Epidemiologic Risks

Associating with sheep and cattle (and other animals) who contaminate water in Africa, Australia, China, Europe, South America.

Eating watergrown plants wild-grown watercress in Europe & morning glory in Asia or otherwise drinking contaminated water.

Syndromes

Liver fluke. It lives in the bile ducts as excretes its eggs.

Several phases:

1) incubation period of a few days to three months with little to no symptoms.

2) invasive with: fever, malaise, abdominal pain, gastrointestinal symptoms, urticaria, anemia, jaundice, and respiratory symptoms.

3) latent with less symptoms and ultimately into a

4) chronic or obstructive phase for months to years with inflammation of the bile ducts, gall bladder, gall stones and fibrosis.

Treatment

Triclabendazole is the treatment of choice, you have to call the CDC for it.

Seroreversion (loss of detectable antibodies) occurs 6 to 12 months after curative therapy.

Bithionol 30 to 50 mg/kg qod for 10 x 15 doses. Perhaps nitazoxanide.

Notes

May be associated with liver cancer but is not the cause of all cancers as one alt med provider suggested: The Bizarre Claims of Hulda Clark .


Fasciola hepatica

Infectious Disease Compendium

Fasciola hepatica

Microbiology

A fluke.

Epidemiologic Risks

Associating with sheep from Africa, Australia, China, Europe, South America.

Syndromes

Acute RUQ pain and jaundice, it lives in the bile ducts as excretes its eggs.

Treatment

Bithionol 30 to 50 mg/kg qod for 10 x 15 doses.

Notes

Last update: 05/05/18