Infectious Disease Compendium

Corynebacterium

Microbiology

Gram positive rods. Sometimes called diptheroides.

C. accolens, C. afermentans ubsp. lipophilum (ANF-1), C. amycolatum, C. argentoratense, C. auris, C. coyleae, C. diphtheriae, C. glucuronolyticum, C. imitans, C. jeikeium, C. lipophiloflavum, C. macginleyi, C. matruchotii, C. minutissimum,C. mucifaciens, C. propinquum, C. pseudodiphtheriticum, C. pseudotuberculosis, C. striatum, C. ulcerans, C. urealyticum, C. xerosis, CDC cornyeform group G.

Epidemiologic Risks

Found on human skin.

Pathogenic C. ulcerans can come from dogs, cats and pigs.

Syndromes

As a group, they cause a smattering of case reports of infections in a variety of poor hosts. Most the time a positive culture represents contamination or colonization. Maybe. There are increasing case reports to suggest it is a pathogen more often than we suspect. When in doubt call your local ID doctor to figure it out.

C. accolens: rare disease.

C. afermentans subsp. lipophilum (ANF-1): bacteremias.

C. amycolatum: bacteremias.

C. argentoratense.

C. auris: ? otitis.

C. coyleae:

C. diphtheriae: diphtheria. Classically it an an oral disease, there is cutaneous disease in heroin users amongst others (PubMed).

C. glucuronolyticum: GU infections in men.

C. imitans: ? diphtheria.

C. jeikeium: variety of nosocomial infections in poor hosts, espcially associated with prosthetic materials.

C. lipophiloflavum: not much.

C. macginleyi: not much.

C. matruchotii:

C. minutissimum: Erythrasma, occasional bacteremias.

C. mucifaciens: a case of cavitary pneumonia.

C. propinquum:

C. pseudodiphtheriticum: infection of prosthetic material, pneumonia in cystic fibrosis (PubMed).

C. pseudotuberculosis: suppurative granulomatous lymphadenitis, often after exposure to cattle, goats, horses.

C. striatum: variety of nosocomial infections in poor hosts, espcially associated with prosthetic materials and prior antibiotic use.

C. ulcerans: mimics diphtheria (PubMed). The family dog and cat can be a source (PubMed) of soft tissue infections (PubMed).

C. urealyticum: UTI in renal transplant patients causing obstruction and encrusting pyelitis (PubMed). A variety of nosocomial infections in poor hosts, espcially associated with prosthetic materials.

C. xerosis: variety of nosocomial infections in poor hosts, esp associated with prosthetic materials.

Treatment

C. accolens: Penicillin, cephalosporins, erythromycin, clindamycin, tetracycline, OR aminoglycosides.

C. afermentans: vancomycin.

C. amycolatum: tetracycline OR vancomycin.

C. argentoratense: Let testing be your guide.

C. auris: ciprofloxacin, gentamicin, tetracycline, OR vancomycin.

C. coyleae: Let testing be your guide.

C. diphtheriae: see diphtheria.

C. glucuronolyticum: beta- lactams, aminoglycosides, OR vancomycin.

C. imitans: Let testing be your guide.

C. jeikeium: vancomycin.

C. lipophiloflavum: Let testing be your guide.

C. macginleyi: Let testing be your guide.

C. matruchotii: Let testing be your guide.

C. minutissimum: Let testing be your guide.

C. mucifaciens: beta-lactams.

C. propinquum: Let testing be your guide.

C. pseudo diphtheriticum: tetracycline OR vancomycin.

C. pseudotuberculosis: erythromycin OR tetracycline.

C. striatum: vancomycin OR penicillin G More MDRO strains reported.

C. ulcerans: Let testing be your guide. "Both the human and the dog C. ulcerans strains were susceptible to amoxicillin, benzyl penicillin, ceftriaxone, erythromycin, ciprofloxacin, vancomycin, linezolid, and tetracycline (PubMed)."

C. urealyticum: vancomycin.

C. xerosis: anything.

CDC cornyeform group G: Let testing be your guide.

Notes